Posts Tagged ‘3rd Party Apps’

VMware View Client for iPad 1.2 Released

October 23rd, 2011

Back in September during the VMworld 2011 US time frame, I wrote New View Client for iPad Sneak Peak at VMworld 2011 which talked about an upcoming release and some of the new features to be expected for VMware’s tablet based View client.  I saw a tweet from Tedd Fox tonight that the new client has been released.  In checking the Apple App Store, indeed it has.

The new version is 1.2 and it boasts the following features and updates:

  • Optimized for VMware View 5 with improved performance
  • Support for iOS 5 including AirPlay
  • Presentation Mode for use with external display and AirPlay
  • Embedded RSA soft token simplifies login to desktop
  • Background tasking to move between Windows and iOS apps
  • Updated look and feel
  • Integrated online help
  • Buffered text input for multibyte text entry
  • Now in French, German, Japanese, Korean, Simplified Chinese
  • Bug Fixes

SnagIt Capture

Requirements: Requires iPad iOS 4.2 or later.

I just upgraded and right away I noticed the new interface as well as some advanced finger gestures I hadn’t seen before (these may or may not be new).

The next thing that I noticed was that I could multitask!  This is the feature I’ve wanted the most personally.  I can now stop in the middle of a session, switch to another application or exit out to the iPad desktop and the View desktop connection remains established when I go back to it.

If you have in iPad, go grab your free copy.  I don’t have an Android but I’m hearing a version was released for that platform as well.

Thank you VMware and Thank you Tedd!

VMTurbo Q4 Release Assures Quality of Service for Apps in the Cloud

October 4th, 2011

Press Release:

VMTurbo Q4 Release Assures Quality of Service for Apps in the Cloud

Streamlines management of large, dynamically changing, shared environments

 

Snagit CaptureWaltham, MA, October 4, 2011 — VMTurbo, the leading provider of intelligent workload management software, today announced new features in its fourth quarter appliance release.  The new version enables enterprises and cloud service providers to guarantee application quality of service (QoS) and to improve policy control in dynamically changing shared infrastructures.

To manage virtualized workloads in large environments, infrastructure operations teams can now group and prioritize applications in order to assure QoS for mission critical workloads.  New business dashboards provide visibility across all layers of the IT stack, and recommend resolutions of the issues impacting application performance in the shared infrastructure.

The new VMTurbo release also adds features to help hosting and cloud providers better manage and support customers in shared, multi-tenant environments:

  • More customizable workload placement policies support a broad range of service level agreements, security policies and compliance requirements;
  • Flexible management of roles and permissions allows assigning a specific scope to a user account;
  • Rebranding support enables cloud service providers to transparently private-label VMTurbo as part of their overall IT offering.

“Our new release is a major step forward for enterprises and cloud service providers looking to guarantee application performance for their business units and customers,” said N. Louis Shipley, President and CEO of VMTurbo. “As more workloads get virtualized, guaranteeing application performance and guaranteeing application quality of service becomes critical.”

Pricing and Availability

For a free, 30-day VMTurbo trial download, go to: http://www.vmturbo.com/vmturbo-management-suite-download/

For more information on and screenshots of the Q4 2011VMTurbo appliance release, read the VMTurbo blog at: http://www.vmturbo.com/blog/

About VMTurbo

VMTurbo delivers an Intelligent Workload Management solution for Cloud and virtualized environments.  VMTurbo uses an economic scheduling engine to dynamically adjust resource allocation to meet business goals.  Using VMTurbo our customers ensure that applications get the resources they need to operate reliably, while utilizing infrastructure and human resources in the most efficient way.

StarWind Software Inc. Announces Opening of German Office

October 4th, 2011

Press Release:

StarWind Software Inc. Announces Opening of German Office

StarWind Software Inc. Opens a New Office in Germany to Drive Local Channel Growth

Snagit CaptureBurlington, MA – October 1, 2011StarWind Software Inc., a global leader and pioneer in SAN software for building iSCSI storage servers, announced today that it has opened a new office in Sankt Augustin, Germany to service the growing demand for StarWind’s iSCSI SAN solutions. The German office expands StarWind’s ability to offer local sales and support services to its fast growing base of customers and prospects in the region.

“We have seen substantial growth in our customer base and level of interest in our solutions in Europe,” said Artem Berman, Chief Executive Officer of StarWind Software. “Since the market potential for our products is significant, we have opened a new office in Germany to strengthen our presence there. We shall use our best efforts to complete the localization of resources.”

“Our local presence in Germany will help us to work closely with our partners and customers, to better meet their needs as well as sweepingly develop their distribution networks,” said Roman Shovkun, Chief Sales Officer of StarWind Software. “The new office permits us to deliver superior sales, support to our customers, and to the growing prospect base in the region.”

The new office is located at:
Monikastr. 13
53757 Sankt Augustin
Germany
Primary contact: Veronica Schmidberger
+49-171-5109103

About StarWind Software Inc.
StarWind Software is a global leader in storage management and SAN software for small and midsize companies. StarWind’s flagship product is SAN software that turns any industry-standard Windows Server into a fault-tolerant, fail-safe iSCSI SAN. StarWind iSCSI SAN is qualified for use with VMware, Hyper-V, XenServer and Linux and Unix environments. StarWind Software focuses on providing small and midsize companies with affordable, highly availability storage technology which previously was only available in high-end storage hardware. Advanced enterprise-class features in StarWind include Automated Storage Node Failover and Failback, Replication across a WAN, CDP and Snapshots, Thin Provisioning and Virtual Tape management.

StarWind is a pioneer, since 2003, in the iSCSI SAN software industry and is the solution of choice for over 30,000 customers worldwide in more than 100 countries and from small and midsize companies to governments and Fortune 1000 companies.

SRM 5.0 Replication Bits and Bytes

October 3rd, 2011

VMware has pushed out several releases and features in the past several weeks.  It can be a lot to digest, particularly if you’ve been involved in the beta programs for these new products because there were some changes made when the bits made their GA debut. One of those new products is SRM 5.0.  I’ve been working a lot with this product lately and I thought it would be helpful to share some of the information I’ve collected along the way.

One of the new features in SRM 5.0 is vSphere Replication.  I’ve heard some people refer to it as Host Based Replication or HBR for short.  In terms of how it works, this is an accurate description and it was the feature name during the beta phase.  However, by the time SRM 5.0 went to GA, each of the replication components went through a name change as you’ll see below. If you know me, you’re aware that I’m somewhat of a stickler on branding.  As such, I try to get it right as much as possible myself, and I’ll sometimes point out corrections to others in an effort to lessen or perpetuate confusion.

Another product feature launched around the same time is the vSphere Storage Appliance or VSA for short.  In my brief experience with both products I’ve mentioned so far, I find it’s not uncommon for people to associate or confuse SRM replication with a dependency on the VSA.  This is not the case – they are quite independent.  In fact, one of the biggest selling points of SRM based replication is that it works with any VMware vSphere certified storage and protocol.  If you think about it for a minute, this now becomes a pretty powerful for getting a DR site set up with what you have today storage wise.  It also allows you to get SRM in the door based on the same principles, with the ability to grow into scalable array based replication in an upcoming budget cycle.

With that out of the way, here’s a glimpse at the SRM 5.0 native replication components and terminology (both beta and GA).

Beta Name GA Name GA Acronym
HBR vSphere Replication VR
HMS vSphere Replication Management Server vRMS
HBR server vSphere Replication Server vRS
ESXi HBR agent vSphere Replication Agent vR agent

 

Here is a look at how the SRM based replication pieces fit in the SRM 5.0 architecture.  Note the storage objects shown are VMFS but they could be both VMFS datastores as well as NFS datastores on either side:

Snagit Capture

Diagram courtesy VMware, Inc.

To review, the benefits of vSphere Replication are:

  1. No requirement for enterprise array based replication at both sites.
  2. Replication between heterogeneous storage, whatever that storage vendor or protocol might be at each site (so long as it’s supported on the HCL).
  3. Per VM replication. I didn’t mention this earlier but it’s another distinct advantage of VR over per datastore replication.
  4. It’s included in the cost of SRM licensing. No extra VMware or array based replication licenses are needed.

Do note that access to the VR feature is by way of a separate installable component of SRM 5.0.  If you haven’t already installed the component during the initial SRM installation, you can do so afterwards by running the SRM 5.0 setup routine again at each site.

I’ve talked about the advantages of VR.  Again, I think they are a big enabler for small to medium sized businesses and I applaud VMware for offering this component which is critical to the best possible RPO and RTO.  But what about the disadvantages compared to array based replication?  In no particular order:

  1. Cannot replicate templates.  The ‘why’ comes next.
  2. Cannot replicate powered off virtual machines.  The ‘why’ for this follows.
  3. Cannot replicate files which don’t change (powered off VMs, ISOs, etc.)  This is because replications are handled by the vRA component – a shim in vSphere’s storage stack deployed on each ESX(i) host.  By the way, Changed Block Tracking (CBT) and VMware snapshots are not used by the vRA.  The mechanism uses a bandwidth efficient technology similar to CBT but it’s worth pointing out it is not CBT.  Another item to note here is that VMs which are shut down won’t replicate writes during the shutdown process.  This is fundamentally because only VMs which are powered on and stay powered on are replicated by VR.  Current state of the VM would, however, be replicated once the VM is powered back on.
  4. Cannot replicate FT VMs. Note that array based replication can be used to protect FT VMs but once recovered they are not longer FT enabled.
  5. Cannot replicate linked clone trees (Lab Manager, vCD, View, etc.)
  6. Array based replication will replicate a VMware based snapshot hierarchy to the destination site while leaving them in tact. VR can replicate VMs with snapshots but they will be consolidated at the destination site.  This is again based on the principle that only changes are replicated to the destination site.
  7. Cannot replicate vApp consistency groups.
  8. VR does not work with virtual disks opened in “multi-writer mode” which is how MSCS VMs are configured.
  9. VR can only be used with SRM.  It can’t be used as a data replication for your vSphere environment outside of SRM.
  10. Losing a vSphere host means that the vRA and the current replication state of a VM or VMs is also lost.  In the event of HA failover, a full-sync must be performed for these VMs once they are powered on at the new host (and vRA).
  11. The number of VMs which can be replicated with VR will likely be less than array based replication depending on the storage array you’re comparing to.  In the beta, VR supported 100 VMs.  At GA, SRM 5.0 supports up to 500 VMs with vSphere Replication. (Thanks Greg)
  12. In band VR requires additional open TCP ports:
    1. 31031 for initial replication
    2. 44046 for ongoing replication
  13. VR requires vSphere 5 hosts at both the protected and recovery sites while array based replication follows only general SRM 5.0 minimum requirements of vCenter 5.0 and hosts which can be 3.5, 4.x, and/or 5.0.

The list of disadvantages appears long but don’t let that stop you from taking a serious look at SRM 5.0 and vSphere Replication.  I don’t think there are many, if any, showstoppers in that list for small to medium businesses.

I hope you find this useful.  I gathered the information from various sources, much of it from an SRM Beta FAQ which to the best of my knowledge are still fact today in the GA release.  If you find any errors or would like to offer corrections or additions, as always please feel free to use the Comments section below.

New View Client for iPad Sneak Peak at VMworld 2011

September 3rd, 2011

Wednesday night I bumped into VMware Product Manager Tedd Fox at the Palazzo pool side party. You may remember Tedd as the man behind the VMware View Client for iPad. He invited me to stop by the VMware EUC booth for a look at “something”.  The following day I met up with him at the booth.  He grabbed his second generation iPad, I rolled camera, and he showed me some never before seen footage of the next release of the VMware View Client for iPad expected to be released within the next few weeks to both iPad generations.

This particular release sports security minded features as well as enhancements to improve ease of use.  Following are some notes on what Ted talked about during the demo of his production environment:

  • Blurred thumbnails of previously opened desktop connections
  • Certificate checking
  • Three native levels of security: High, Medium, and Low
  • Embedded RSA Soft Token
  • The above keyboard toolbar has been modified to display most of the commonly used function and arrow keys above the keyboard instead of on a separate “floater” which consumed valuable display real estate
  • Plugging in the video out dongle converts the iPad into a Macbook pro sized trackpad and keyboard
  • Release expected within the next few weeks in the App Store
  • Will be compatible with Apple IOS 5
  • An Android version (minus presentation mode) will be made available at the same time, in addition to Cisco Cius

Following is a video capture of the demo and below that a static image of presentation mode trackpad and keyboard:

Tedd didn’t have video dongle at the time of the interview but he did follow up with an email showing what presentation mode trackpad and keyboard looks like on the iPad:

SnagIt Capture

I’d like to thank Tedd and VMware for their time and the exclusive demo.  As a gen 1 iPad owner who already has gotten a lot of mileage out of the View Client for iPad + View 4.6 and now 5.0 beta, I’m pretty excited about this release and future developments.  The iPad and other comparable tablets are convenient for conferences such as VMworld because of apps like the one Tedd develops.  Just Enough Device to access email, access my calendar and schedule, access my home lab remotely while in a VMworld session.

vCenter Server 5.0 and MS SQL Database Permissions

August 20th, 2011

It’s that time again (to bring up the age old topic of Microsoft SQL database permission requirements in order to install VMware vCenter Server).  This brief article focuses on vCenter 5.0.  Permissions on the SQL side haven’t changed at all based on what was required in vSphere 4.  However, the error displayed for lacking required permissions to the MSDB System database has.  In fact, in my opinion it’s a tad misleading.

To review, the vCenter database account being used to make the ODBC connection requires the db_owner role on the MSDB System database during the installation of vCenter Server.  This facilitates the installation of SQL Agent jobs for vCenter statistic rollups.

In the example below, I’m using SQL authentication with an account named vcenter.  I purposely left out its required role on MSDB and you can see below the resulting error:

The DB user entered does not have the required permissions needed to install and configure vCenter Server with the selected DB.  Please correct the following error(s):  The database user ‘vcenter’ does not have the following privileges on the ‘vc50’ database:

EXECUTE sp_add_category

EXECUTE sp_add_job

EXECUTE sp_add_jobschedule

EXECUTE sp_add_jobserver

EXECUTE sp_add_jobstep

EXECUTE sp_delete_job

EXECUTE sp_update_job

SELECT syscategories

SELECT sysjobs

SELECT sysjobsteps

Snagit Capture

Now what I think is misleading about the error thrown is that it’s pointing the finger at missing permissions on the vc50 database.  This is incorrect.  My vcenter SQL account has db_owner permissions on the vc50 vCenter database.  The problem is actually lacking the temporary db_owner permissions on the MSDB System database at vCenter installation time as described earlier.

The steps to rectify this situation are the same as before.  Grant the vcenter account the db_owner role for the MSDB System database, install vCenter, then revoke that role when vCenter installation is complete. While we’re on the subject, the installation of vCenter Update Manager 5.0 with a Microsoft SQL back end database also requires the ODBC connection account to temporarily have db_owner permissions on the MSDB System database.  I do believe this is a new requirement in vSphere 5.0.  If you’re going to install VUM, you might as well do that first before going through the process of revoking the db_owner role.

An example of where that role is added in SQL Server 2008 R2 Management Studio is shown below:

Snagit Capture

Pulse Check and New Sponsor – Tintri

August 15th, 2011

Hello VMware virtualization enthusiasts!  The month of August has been intense as VMworld 2011 approaches.  I’ve been working on a few projects which need to get out the door before the the big event.  Unfortunately I’ve had no time to polish vCalendar 3.0 such that it’s ready by show time.  As usual, I’ve been collecting the new content throughout the past year but it’s nowhere near ready for presentation.  The good news is that it’s coming but it may not be until mid September or October.  AND… I’ll still plan on releasing the 2.0 PDF version at no cost.  If you’ve been counting on the new vCalendar, thank you in advance for your patience.

I’ve still got a lot of content in the queue to write about here on the blog.  A lot of it vSphere 5 related.  I’ve also been picking up a lot on SRM 5.  I’ll probably get back into the regular writing schedule after VMworld.  It’s a busy time for VMware and their partners.  I’ve always been busy around VMworld but now that I work for a partner, it’s a new level of busy.

Before I get back to it, I wanted to take this opportunity to introduce a new blog sponsor: Tintri.  They are in the business of providing VM-aware storage without complexity and performance bottlenecks.  Tintri offers 8.5TB of usable storage in a 4u single-datastore footprint.  You’ll find their banner on the right edge of this blog.  Check them out online or stop by their booth at VMworld 2011 in Las Vegas.  Last but not least, you can follow them on Twitter – @TintriInc.