Archive for December, 2010

IBM x3850 M2 shows 8 sockets on ESXi 4.1

December 9th, 2010

Working with an IBM x3850 M2, I noticed VMware ESXi 4.1 was reporting 8 processor sockets when I know this model has only 4 sockets.  It was easily noticable as I ran out of ESX host licensing prematurely.  The problem is also reported with the IBM x3950 M2 in this thread.

SnagIt Capture

SnagIt Capture

Here’s the fix:  Reboot the host and flip a setting in the BIOS.

POST -> F1 -> Advanced Setup -> CPU Options -> Clustering Technology. Toggle the Clustering Technology configuration from Logical Mode to Physical Mode.

After the above change is made, sanity is restored in that ESXi 4.1 will properly see 4 sockets and licenses will be consumed appropriately.

SnagIt Capture

SnagIt Capture

Memory Compression Video

December 9th, 2010

Vladan SEGET created a blog post on VMware ESX(i) 4.1 Memory Compression.  In his post, he linked to a fantastically simple vmwaretv video demonstration  of memory compression in action compared to a hypervisor with no memory compression enabled.  For anyone looking for the tool used in the video to perform your own memory compression testing but cannot find it, it’s “around”.  Let me know and I might be able to help you find it.

I was going to update my memory compression blog post crediting Vladan and embedding the video, but sadly, I have no memory compression blog post yet!  So instead, I send you to Vladan’s ESX Virtualization blog using the link above.

Note to self: create a memory compression blog post.

VMware vSphere 4.1 HA and DRS technical deepdive arrival

December 7th, 2010

IMG01201-20101207-1659

I think Eric “Scoop” Sloof was the first to announce this yesterday, complete with a video and everything! Come on Eric, let some of the other bloggers have your scraps. 8-)

I received a copy of a brand new book hot off the presses titled VMware vSphere 4.1 HA and DRS technical deepdive by Duncan Epping and Frank Denneman.  Having just received it tonight, of course I haven’t had time to finish reading it yet.  This is the pre-game party blog post.  Just by thumbing through the pages, I’m going to draw a few conclusions.  I’ll see if I’m right by the time I actually finish reading the book.

  1. 224 pages and 18 chapters in length.  I’ve seen entire virtual infrastructure books which have been written in as many or less pages than this.  And this book covers just HA and DRS.
    Conclusion: Even factoring in a fair amount of diagrams, this will be the most comprehensive HA and DRS handbook in existence.
  2. HA and DRS are perhaps two of the most misunderstood and misinterpreted technologies in VMware’s suite of virtual infrastructure offerings.  What exactly is confusing about these tools?  First, they are both set-it-and-forget-it automation.  The technologies will more or less “just work” out of the box.  This simplicity bestows an overwhelming amount of confidence in cluster configuration because the complexity is masked by an easy to use interface.
    Conclusion: There’s a lot going on under the hood in both HA and DRS that administrators should know about to properly configure and tune their environment.  The detail this book goes into should rock your world.
  3. This book covers DPM.
    Conclusion: That is good.
  4. There are many great looking diagrams and flowcharts.
    Conclusion: Very helpful in reinforcing what’s written in detail.

I look forward to relaxing with this book while on vacation the rest of this week.  Nice job from what I’ve seen so far guys!

You can read a review, write a review, or purchase this book on Amazon’s web site here.

Old Games Revisited

December 1st, 2010

I got the bug tonight to try one of my old PC games.  I still have several of them on my hard drive dating back to the early to mid 1990’s.  Each time I re-image PC, I make sure that I preserve these games by backing up and restoring their directory structures. 

I wasn’t sure if they would work under Windows 7 but I decided to give it a try.  I made a few attempts to get Doom II launched using various compatibility mode settings but none worked. 

When that failed, I quickly stumbled on skulltag.com.  It’s a free Windows download which lets you play Doom and Doom II on modern Windows platforms.  Not only that, you can play online with other players from the internet.  I downloaded and installed the software and I was literally playing online with another player within a minute.

The following videos bring back a lot of great memories of modem and LAN gaming with old friends in my 20’s and are nothing short of amazing!

Doom II finished in 14:41

Quake finished in 17:38

Quake 2 finished in 21:06