Posts Tagged ‘vSphere Client’

VMware vCenter Cookbook

July 27th, 2015

Back in June, I was extended an offer from PACKT Publishing to review a new VMware book. I’ve got a lot on my plate at the moment but it sounded like an easier read and I appreciated the offer as well as the accommodation of my request for paperback in lieu of electronic copy so I accepted. I finished reading it this past weekend.

The book’s title is VMware vCenter Cookbook and it is PACKT’s latest addition to an already extensive Cookbook series (Interested in Docker, DevOps, or Data Science? There’s Cookbooks for that). Although it was first published in May 2015, the content isn’t quite so new as its coverage includes vSphere 5, and vSphere 5 only with specific focus on vSphere management via vCenter Server as the title of the book indicates. The author is Konstantin Kuminsky and as I mentioned earlier the book is made available in both Kindle and paperback formats.

Admittedly I’m not familiar with PACKT’s other Cookbooks but the formula for this one is much the same as the others I imagine: “Over 65 hands-on recipes to help you efficiently manage your vSphere environment with VMware vCenter”. Each of the recipes ties to a management task that an Administrator of a vSphere environment might need to carry out day to day, weekly, monthly, or perhaps annually. Some of the recipes can also be associated with and aid in design, architecture, and planning although I would not say these are not the main areas of focus. The majority of the text is operational in nature.

The recipes are organized by chapter and while going from one to the next, there may be a correlation, but often there is not. It should be clear at this point it reads like a cookbook, and not a mystery novel (although for review purposes I did read it cover to cover). Find the vCenter how-to recipe you need via the Table of Contents or the index and follow it. Expect no more and no less.

Speaking of the Table of Contents…

  • Chapter 1: vCenter Basic Tasks and Features
  • Chapter 2: Increasing Environment Availability
  • Chapter 3: Increasing Environment Scalability
  • Chapter 4: Improving Environment Efficiency
  • Chapter 5: Optimizing Resource Usage
  • Chapter 6: Basic Administrative Tasks
  • Chapter 7: Improving Environment Manageability

It’s a desktop reference (or handheld I suppose depending on your preferred consumption model) which walks you through vSphere packaging and licensing on one page, and NUMA architecture on the next. The focus is vCenter Server and perhaps more accurately vSphere management. Fortunately that means there is quite a bit of ESXi coverage as well with management inroads from vCenter, PowerShell, and esxcli. Both Windows and appliance vCenter Server editions are included as well as equally fair coverage of both vSphere legacy client and vSphere web client.

Bottom line: It’s a good book but it would have been better had it been released at least a year or two earlier. Without vSphere 6 coverage, there’s not a lot of mileage left on the odometer. In fairness I will state that many of the recipes will translate identically or closely to vSphere 6, but not all of them. To provide a few examples, VM templates and their best operational practices haven’t changed that much. On the other hand, there are significant differences between FT capabilities and limitations between vSphere 5 and vSphere 6. From a technical perspective, I found it pretty spot on which means the author and/or the reviewers did a fine job.

Thank you PACKT Publishing for the book and the opportunity.

Legacy vSphere Client Plug-in 1.7 Released for Storage Center

July 23rd, 2014

Dell Compellent Storage Center customers who use the legacy vSphere Client plug-in to manage their storage may have noticed that the upgrade to PowerCLI 5.5 R2 which released with vSphere 5.5 Update 1 essentially “broke” the plug-in. This forced customers to make the decision to stay on PowerCLI 5.5 in order to use the legacy vSphere Client plug-in, or reap the benefits of the PowerCLI 5.5 R2 upgrade with the downside being they had to abandon use of the legacy vSphere Client plug-in.

For those that are unaware, there is a 3rd option and that is to leverage vSphere’s next generation web client along with the web client plug-in released by Dell Compellent last year (I talked about it at VMworld 2013 which you can take a quick look at below).

Although VMware strongly encourages customers to migrate to the next generation web client long term, I’m here to tell you that in the interim Dell has revd the legacy client plug-in to version 1.7 which is now compatible with PowerCLI 5.5 R2.  Both the legacy and web client plug-ins are free and quite beneficial from an operations standpoint so I encourage customers to get familiar with the tools and use them.

Other bug fixes in this 1.7 release include:

  • Datastore name validation not handled properly
  • Create Datastore, map existing volume – Server Mapping will be removed from SC whether or not it was created by VSP
  • Add Raw Device wizard is not allowing to uncheck a host once selected
  • Remove Raw Device wizard shows wrong volume size
  • Update to use new code signing certificate
  • Prevent Datastores & RDMs with underlying Live Volumes from being expanded or deleted
  • Add support for additional Flash Optimized Storage Profiles that were added in SC 6.4.2
  • Block size not offered when creating VMFS-3 Datastore from Datacenter menu item
  • Add Raw Device wizard is not allowing a host within the same cluster as the select host to be unchecked once it has been selected
  • Add RDM wizard – properties screen showing wrong or missing values
  • Expire Replay wizard – no error reported if no replays selected
  • Storage Consumption stats are wrong if a Disk folder has more than one Storage Type

Failed to connect to VMware Lookup Service

March 14th, 2014

Judging by the search results returned by Google, it looks like my blog is among the few virtualization blogs remaining which does not have a writeup on this topic.  It’s Friday so… why not.

Scenario:  vSphere 5.5 Update 1 VMware vSphere Web Client fails to log into vCenter Server (appliance version) with the following error returned:

Failed to connect to VMware Lookup Service

https://fqdn:7444/lookupservice/sdk –

SSL certificate verification failed.

Snagit Capture

Contributing factors in my case which may have played a role in this once working environment:

  1. Recently upgraded vCenter 5.5.0 Server appliance to Update 1 (unlikely as other similar environments were not impacted after upgrade)
  2. This particular vCenter appliance was deployed as a vApp from a vCloud Director catalog (likely  but unknown at this time if a customization was possible or attempted during deployment)
  3. The hostname of the appliance may have been changed recently (very likely)

The solution is quite simple.

  1. Log into the vCenter Server appliance management interface (https://fqdn:5480/)
  2. Navigate to the Admin tab
  3. Certificate regeneration enabled: choose Yes
  4. Click the Submit button
  5. Navigate to the System tab
  6. Reboot the appliance

After the appliance reboots

  1. Log into the vCenter Server appliance management interface (https://fqdn:5480/)
  2. Navigate to the Admin tab
  3. Certificate regeneration enabled: choose No
  4. Click the Submit button
  5. Log out of the vCenter Server appliance management interface
  6. Log into the VMware vSphere Web Client normally

Admittedly I recalled the Certificate regeneration feature first by logging into the vCenter Server appliance management interface, but then verified with a search to ensure the purpose of the Certificate regeneration feature.  The search results turned up Failed to connect to VMware Lookup Service – SSL Certificate Verification Failed (among many other blog posts as mentioned earlier) in addition to VMware KB 20333338 Troubleshooting the vCenter Server Appliance with Single Sign-On login.  Both more or less highlight a discrepancy between the appliance hostname and the SSL certificate resulting in the need to regenerate the certificate to match the currently assigned hostname.

I ran across another issue this week during the Update 1 upgrade to the vCenter appliance which I may or may not get to writing about today.

At any rate, have wonderful and Software Defined weekend!

vSphere 5.1 Update 1 Update Sequence

May 6th, 2013

Not so long ago, VMware product releases were staggered.  Major versions of vSphere would launch at or shortly after VMworld in the fall, and all other products such as SRM, View, vCloud Director, etc. would rev on some other random schedule.  This was extremely frustrating for a vEvangelist because we wanted to be on the latest and greatest platform but lack of compatibility with the remaining bolt-on products held us back.

While this was a wet blanket for eager lab rats, it was a major complexity for production environments.  VMware understood this issue and at or around the vSphere 5.0 launch (someone correct me if I’m wrong here), all the development teams in Palo Alto synchronized their watches & revd product in essence at the same time.  This was great and it added the much needed flexibility for production environment migrations.  However, in a way it masked an issue which didn’t really exist before by virtue of product release staggering – a clear and understandable order of product upgrades.  That is why in March of 2012, I looked at all the product compatibility matrices and sort of came up with my own “cheat sheet” of product compatibility which would lend itself to an easy to follow upgrade path, at least for the components I had in my lab environment.

vSphere 5.1 Update 1 launched on 4/25/13 and along with it a number of other products were revd for compatibility.  To guide us on the strategic planning and tactical deployment of the new software bundles, VMware issued KB Article 2037630 Update sequence for vSphere 5.1 Update 1 and its compatible VMware products.

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Not only does VMware provide the update sequencing information, but there are also exists a complete set of links to specific product upgrade procedures and release notes which can be extremely useful for planning and troubleshooting.

The vCloud Suite continues to evolve providing agile and elastic infrastructure services for businesses around the globe in a way which makes IT easier and more practical for consumers but quite a bit more complex on the back end for those who must design, implement, and support it.  Visit the KB Article and give it 5 stars.  Let VMware know this is an extremely helpful type of collateral for those in the trenches.

VMworld 2012 Announcements – Part I

August 27th, 2012

VMworld 2012 is underway in San Francisco.  Once again, a record number of attendees is expected to gather at the Moscone Center to see what VMware and their partners are announcing.  From a VMware perspective, there is plenty.

Given the sheer quantity of announcements, I’m actually going to break up them up into a few parts, this post being Part I.  Let’s start with the release of vSphere 5.1 and some of its notable features.

Enhanced vMotion – the ability to now perform a vMotion as well as a Storage vMotion simultaneously. In addition, this becomes an enabler to perform vMotion without the shared storage requirement.  Enhanced vMotion means we are able to migrate a virtual machine stored on local host storage, to shared storage, and then to local storage again.  Or perhaps migrate virtual machines from one host to another with each having their own locally attached storage only.  Updated 9/5/12 The phrase “Enhanced vMotion” should be correctly read as “vMotion that has been enhanced”.  “Enhanced vMotion” is not an actual feature, product, or separate license.  It is an improvement over the previous vMotion technology and included wherever vMotion is bundled.

Snagit Capture

Enhanced vMotion Requirements:

  • Hosts must be managed by same vCenter Server
  • Hosts must be part of same Datacenter
  • Hosts must be on the same layer-2 network (and same switch if VDS is used)

Operational Considerations:

  • Enhanced vMotion is a manual process
  • DRS and SDRS automation do not leverage enhanced vMotion
  • Max of two (2) concurrent Enhanced vMotions per host
  • Enhanced vMotions count against concurrent limitations for both vMotion and Storage vMotion
  • Enhanced vMotion will leverage multi-NIC when available

Next Generation vSphere Client a.k.a. vSphere Web Client – An enhanced version of the vSphere Web Client which has already been available in vSphere 5.0.  As of vSphere 5.1, the vSphere Web Client becomes the defacto standard client for managing the vSphere virtualized datacenter.  Going forward, single sign-on infrastructure management will converge into a unified interface which any administrator can appreciate.  vSphere 5.1 will be the last platform to include the legacy vSphere client. Although you may use this client day to day while gradually easing into the Web Client, understand that all future development from VMware and its partners now go into the Web Client. Plug-ins currently used today will generally still function with the legacy client (with support from their respective vendors) but they’ll need to be completely re-written vCenter Server side for the Web Client.  Aside from the unified interface, the architecture of the Web Client has scaling advantages as well.  As VMware adds bolt-on application functionality to the client, VMware partners will now have the ability to to bring their own custom objects objects into the Web Client thereby extending that single pane of glass management to other integrations in the ecosystem.

Here is a look at that vSphere Web Client architecture:

Snagit Capture

Requirements:

  • Internet Explorer / FireFox / Chrome
  • others (Safari, etc.) are possible, but will lack VM console access

A look at the vSphere Web Client interface and its key management areas:

Snagit Capture

Where the legacy vSphere Client fall short and now the vSphere Web Client solves these issues:

  • Single Platform Support (Windows)
    • vSphere Web Client is Platform Agnostic
  • Scalability Limits
    • Built to handle thousands of objects
  • White Screen of Death
    • Performance
  • Inconsistent look and feel across VMware solutions
    • Extensibility
  • Workflow Lock
    • Pause current task and continue later right where you left off (this one is cool!)
    • Browser Behavior
  • Upgrades
    • Upgrade a Single serverside component

 vCloud Director 5.1

In the recent past, VMware aligned common application and platform releases to ease issues that commonly occurred with compatibility.  vCloud Director, the cornerstone of the vCloud Suite, is obviously the cornerstone in how VMware will deliver infrastructure, applications, and *aaS now and into the future. So what’s new in vCloud Director 5.1?  First an overview of the vCloud Suite:

Snagit Capture

And a detailed list of new features:

  • Elastic Virtual Datacenters – Provider vDCs can span clusters leveraging VXLAN allowing the distribution and mobility of vApps across infrastructure and the growing the vCloud Virtual Datacenter
  • vCloud Networking & Security VXLAN
  • Profile-Driven Storage integration with user and storage provided capabilities
  • Storage DRS (SDRS) integration
    • Exposes storage Pod as first class storage container (just like a datastores) making it visible in all workflows where a datastore is visible
    • Creation, modification, and deletion of spods not possible in vCD
    • Member datastore operations not permissible in VCD
  • Single level Snapshot & Revert support for vApps (create/revert/remove); integration with Chargeback
  • Integrated vShield Edge Gateway
  • Integrated vShield Edge Configuration
  • vCenter Single Sign-On (SSO)
  • New Features in Networking
    • Integrated Organization vDC Creation Workflow
    • Creates compute, storage, and networking objects in a single workflow
    • The Edge Gateway are exposed at Organization vDC level
    • Organization vDC networks replace Organization networks
    • Edge Gateways now support:
      • Multiple Interfaces on a Edge Gateway
      • The ability to sub-allocate IP pools to a Edge Gatewa
      • Load balancing
      • HA (not the same as vSphere HA)
        • Two edge VMs deployed in Active-Passive mode
        • Enabled at time of gateway creation
        • Can also be changed after the gateway has been completed
        • Gets deployed with first Organizational network created that uses this gateway
      • DNS Relay
        • Provides a user selectable checkbox to enable
        • If DNS servers are defined for the selected external network, DNS requests will be sent to the specified server. If not, then DNS requests will be sent to the default gateway of the external network.
      • Rate limiting on external interface
    • Organization networks replaced by Organization vDC Networks
      • Organization vDC Networks are associated with an Organization vDC
      • The network pool associated with Organization vDC is used to create routed and isolated Organization vDC networks
      • Can be shared across Organization vDCs in an Organization
    • Edge Gateways
      • Are associated with an Organization vDC, can not be shared across Organization vDCs
      • Can be connected to multiple external networks
        • Multiple routed Organization vDC networks will be connected to the same Edge Gateway
      • External network connectivity for the Organization vDC Network can be changed after creation by changing the external networks which the edge gateway is connected.
      • Allows IP pool of external networks to be sub-allocated to the Edge Gateway
        • Needs to be specified in case of NAT and Load Balancer
    • New Features in Gateway Services
      • Load balancer service on Edge Gateways
      • Ability to add multiple subnets to VPN tunnels
      • Ability to add multiple DHCP IP pools
      • Ability to add explicit SNAT and DNAT rules providing user with full control over address translation
      • IP range support in Firewall and NAT services
      • Service Configuration Changes
        • Services are configured on Edge Gateway instead of at the network level
        • DHCP can be configured on Isolated Organization vDC networks.
  • Usability Features
    • New default branding style
      • Cannot revert back to the Charcoal color scheme
      • Custom CSS files will require modification
    • Improved “Add vApp from Catalog” wizard workflow
    • Easy access to VM Quota and Lease Expirations
    • New dropdown menu that includes details and search
    • Redesigned catalog navigation and sub-entity hierarchy
    • Enhanced help and documentation links
  • Virtual Hardware Version 9
    • Supports features presented by HW9 (like 64 CPU support)
    • Supports Hardware Virtualization Calls
    • VT-x/EPT or AMD-V/RVI
    • Memory overhead increased, vMotion limited to like hardware
    • Enable/Disable exposed to users who have rights to create a vApp Template
  • Additional Guest OS Support
    • Windows 8
    • Mac OS 10.5, 10.6 and 10.7
  • Storage Independent of VM Feature
    • Added support for Independent Disks
    • Provides REST API support for actions on Independent Disks
      • As these consume disk space, the vCD UI was updated to show user when they are used:
      • Organizations List Page
      • A new Independent Disks count column is added.
      • Organization Properties Page
      • Independent Disks tab is added to show all independent disks belonging to vDC
      • Tab is not shown if no independent disk exists in the vDC.
      • Virtual Machine Properties Page
      • Hardware tab->Hard Disks section, attached independent disks are shown by their names and all fields for the disk are disabled as they are not editable.

That’s all I have time for right now.  As I said, there is more to come later on topics such as vDS enhancements, VXLAN, SRM, vCD Load Balancing, and vSphere Replication.  Stay tuned!

vSphere 5.0 Update 1 and Related Product Launches

March 16th, 2012

VMware has unveiled a point release update to several of their products tied to the vSphere 5 virtual cloud datacenter platform plus a few new product launches.

vCenter 5.0 Update 1 – Added support for new guest operating systems such as Windows 8, Ubuntu, and SLES 11 SP2, the usual resolved issues and bug fixes, plus some updates around vRAM limits licensing.  One other notable – no compatibility at this time with vSphere Data Recovery (vDR) 2.0 according to the compatibility matrix.

ESXi 5.0 Update 1 – Added support for new AMD and Intel processors, Mac OS X Server Lion, updated chipset drivers, resolved issues and bug fixes.  One interesting point to be made here is that according to the compatibility matrix, vCenter 5.0 supports ESXi 5.0 Update 1.  I’m going to stick with the traditional route of always upgrading vCenter before upgrading hosts as a best practices habit until something comes along to challenge that logic.

vCloud Director 1.5.1 – Added support for vSphere 5.0 Update 1 and vShield 5.0.1, plus RHEL 5 Update 7 as a supported server cell platform.  Enhancements were made around firewall rules, AMQP system notifications, log collection, chargeback retention, resolved issues, and added support for AES-256 encryption on Site-to-Site VPN tunnels (unfortunately no vSphere 5.0 Update 1 <-> vCloud Connector 1.5 support).  Oh yes, sometime over the past few months, VMware Marketing has quietly changed the acronym for vCloud Director from vCD to VCD.  We’ll just call that a new feature for 1.5.1 going forward.  I <3 the Marketing team.

Site Recovery Manager 5.0.1 – Added support for vSphere 5.0 Update 1 plus a “Forced Failover” feature which allows VM recovery in cases where storage arrays fail at the protected site which, in the past, lead to unmanageable VMs which cannot be shut down, powered off, or unregistered.  Added IP customization for some Ubuntu platforms.  Many bug fixes, oh yes.  VMware brought back an advanced feature which hasn’t been seen since SRM 4.1 which provided a configurable option, storageProvider.hostRescanCnt, allowing repeated host scans during testing and recovery. This option was removed from SRM 5.0 but has been restored in the Advanced Settings menu in SRM 5.0.1 and can be particularly useful in troubleshooting a failed Recovery Plan. Right-click a site in the Sites view, select Advanced Settings, then select storageProvider. See KB 1008283.  Storage arrays certified on SRM 5.0 (ie. Dell Compellent Storage Center) are automatically certified on SRM 5.0.1.

View 5.0.1 – Added support for vSphere 5.0 Update 1, new Connection Server, Agent, Clients, fixed known issues.  Ahh.. let’s go back to that new clients bit.  New bundled Mac OS X client with support for PCoIP!  I don’t have a Mac so those who would admit to calling me a friend will have to let me know how sharp that v1.4 Mac client is.  As mentioned in earlier release notes, Ubuntu got a plenty of love this week.  Including a new View PCoIP version 1.4 client for Ubuntu Linux.  I might just have to deploy an Ubuntu desktop somewhere to test this client.  But wait, there’s more.  New releases of the View client for Android and iPad tablets.  The Android client adds fixes for Ice Cream Sandwich devices, security stuff, and updates for the Kindle Fire (I need to get this installed on my wife’s Fire).  The updated iPad client improves both connection times as well as external display support but for the most part Apple fans are flipping out simply over something shiny and new.  Lastly, VMware created a one stop shop web portal for all client downloads which can be fetched at http://www.vmware.com/go/viewclients/

vShield 5.0.1 – Again, added support for vSphere 5.0 Update 1, enhanced reporting and export options, new REST API calls, improved audit logs, simplified troubleshooting, improved vShield App policy management as well as HA enhancements, and enablement of Autodeploy through vShield VIB host modules downloadable from vShield Manager.

So… looking at the compatibility matrix with all of these new code drops, my lab upgrade order will look something like this:

1a. View 5.0 –> View 5.0.1

1b. vCD 1.5 –> VCD 1.5.1

1c. SRM 5.0 –> SRM 5.0.1

1d. vShield App/Edge/Endpoint 5.0 –> 5.0.1

1e. vDR 2.0 –> Go Fish

2. vSphere Client 5.0.1 (it’s really not an upgrade, installs parallel with other versions)

3. vCenter Server 5.0 –> vCenter Server 5.0 Update 1

4. Update Manager 5.0 –> Update Manager 5.0 Update 1

5. ESXi 5.0 –> ESXi 5.0 Update 1

There are a lot of versions in play here which weaves somewhat of a tangled web of compatibility touch points to identify before diving head first into upgrades.  I think VMware has done a great job this time around with releasing products that are, for the most part, compatible with other currently shipping products which provides more flexibility in tactical approach and timelines.  Add to that, some time ago they’ve migrated a two dimensional .PDF based compatibility matrix into an online portal offering interactive input making the set of results customized for the end user.  The only significant things missing in the vSphere 5.0U1 compatibility picture IMO are vCloud Connector, vDR, and based on the results from the compatibility matrix portal – vCenter Operations (output showed no compatibility with vSphere 5.x, didn’t look right to me).  I’ve taken a liberty in creating a component compatibility visual roadmap including most of the popular and currently shipping products vSphere 5.0 and above.  If you’ve got a significant amount of infrastructure to upgrade, this may help you get the upgrade order sorted out quickly.  One last thing – Lab Manager and ESX customers should pay attention to the Island of Misfit Toys.  In early 2013 the Lab Manager ride comes coasting to a stop.  Lab Manager and ESX customers should be formulating solid migration plans with an execution milestone coming soon.

Snagit Capture

VMware vCenter as a vCloud Director vApp

February 27th, 2012

Snagit CaptureThe way things work out, I tend to build a lot of vCenter Servers in the lab.  Or at least it feels like I do.  I need to test this.  A customer I’m meeting with wants to specifically see that.  I need don’t want to taint or impact an existing vCenter Server which may already be dedicated to something else having more importance.  VMware Site Recovery Manager is a good example.  Each time I bring up an environment I need a pair of vCenter Servers which may or not be available.  Whatever the reason, I’ve reached the point where I don’t need to experience the build process repeatedly.

The Idea

A while ago, I had stood up a private cloud for the Technical Solutions/Technical Marketing group at Dell Compellent.  I saved some time by leveraging that cloud environment to quickly provision platforms I could install vCenter Server instances on.  vCenter Servers as vApps – fantastic use case.  However, the vCenter installation process is lengthy enough that I wanted something more in terms of automated cookie cutter deployment which I didn’t have to spend a lot of time on.  What if I took one of the Windows Server 2008 R2 vApps from the vCD Organization Catalog, deployed it as a vApp, bumped up the vCPU and memory count, installed the vSphere Client, vCenter Server, licenses, a local MS SQL Express database, and the Dell Compellent vSphere client plug-in (download|demo video), and then added that vApp back to the vCD Organization Catalog?  Perhaps not such a supported configuration by VMware or Microsoft, but could I then deploy that vApp as future vCenter instances?  Better yet, build a vApp consisting of a pair of vCenter Servers for the SRM use case?  It sounded feasible.  My biggest concerns were things like vCenter and SQL Express surviving the name and IP address change as part of the vCD customization.

The POC

Although I ran into some unrelated customization issues which seemed to have something to do with vCD, Windows Server 2008 R2, and VMXNET3 vNICs (error message: “could not find network adapters as specified by guest customization. Log file is at c:\windows\temp\customize-guest.log.” I’ll save that for a future blog post if I’m able to root cause the problem), the Proof of Concept test results thus far have been successful.  After vCD customization, I was able to add vSphere 5 hosts and continue with normal operations from there.

Initially, I did run into one minor issue and that was hosts would fall into a disconnected status approximately two minutes after being connected to the vCenter Server.  This turned out to be a Windows Firewall issue which was introduced during the customization process.  Also, there were some red areas under the vCenter Service Status which pointed to the old instance name (most fixes for that documented well by Rick Vanover here, plus the vCenter Inventory Service cleanup at VMware KB 2009934).

The Conclusion

To The Cloud!  You don’t normally hear that from me on a regular basis but in this case it fits.  A lengthy and increasingly cumbersome task was made more efficient with vCloud Director and vSphere 5.  Using the Linked Clone feature yields both of its native benefits: Fast Provisioning and Space Efficiency.  I’ll continue to leverage vCD for similar and new use cases where I can.  Lastly, this solution can also be implemented with VMware Lab Manager or simply as a vSphere template.  Caveats being Lab Manager retires in a little over a year and a vSphere Template won’t be as space efficient as a Linked Clone.